My sister recently discovered Pottermore, and (after visiting the five stages of grief over not being a Gryffindor) finally accepted the fact that we’re both Slytherins.
   I felt pure joy in reading my own Slytherin welcome letter——a confirmation of something I had suspected about myself since I cracked open a copy of The Sorcerer’s Stone in seventh grade. And, understanding the kind of existential distress that an adult woman can have upon revealing her fictional Hogwarts House, I’m grateful that my result validated an entire adolescence’s worth of self-identification.
   However, I always secretly fear whether or not a real Sorting Hat would have looked straight past my awkward eleven-year-old weirdness for my potential, or just seen this shy, insecure little misfit hiding behind four inches of bangs and immediately dismissed me to the Hufflepuff table, on grounds that they were the least likely to lock me in a vanishing cabinet.    I have a bone to pick with the administrative whackadoo thought that eleven was the perfect age to mark young witches and wizards with a stigmatizing social label that will become the most important determining factor by which employers will judge them for the rest of their lives.  {+more}

My sister recently discovered Pottermore, and (after visiting the five stages of grief over not being a Gryffindor) finally accepted the fact that we’re both Slytherins.

   I felt pure joy in reading my own Slytherin welcome letter——a confirmation of something I had suspected about myself since I cracked open a copy of The Sorcerer’s Stone in seventh grade. And, understanding the kind of existential distress that an adult woman can have upon revealing her fictional Hogwarts House, I’m grateful that my result validated an entire adolescence’s worth of self-identification.

   However, I always secretly fear whether or not a real Sorting Hat would have looked straight past my awkward eleven-year-old weirdness for my potential, or just seen this shy, insecure little misfit hiding behind four inches of bangs and immediately dismissed me to the Hufflepuff table, on grounds that they were the least likely to lock me in a vanishing cabinet.
   I have a bone to pick with the administrative whackadoo thought that eleven was the perfect age to mark young witches and wizards with a stigmatizing social label that will become the most important determining factor by which employers will judge them for the rest of their lives{+more}

harry potter houseprideweek slytherinpride

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

This is so important.

I know I’m probably preaching to the choir, Tumblr, but it is astounding how many people don’t understand the full magnitude of this issue. As artists, craftsmen, authors, musicians, bloggers or whatever you are, it is your right in this modern world to utilize social media and self-publishing tools to the best of your ability. It is absolutely unethical for your Internet service providers (which essentially share a monopoly on the industry) to inhibit their users from accessing your content. Now imagine your Tumblr blog, YouTube channel or Etsy shop becoming inaccessible to the average Internet user, due to intentionally slow Internet speeds (or, in some cases, a flat out ban on your content unless the subscriber upgrades to a more expensive Internet package).
Ending net neutrality will eliminate the Internet as a publishing source for self-employed entrepreneurs and ultimately squash the DIY ethic.

Please do what’s right. Take a stand for net neutrality.

net neutrality

In Russian folklore, every home is said to have a domovoi: a house spirit who protects the family and sometimes helps out with household chores. Most domovoi are good, but some will cause mischief if the home (and he) feels neglected.
This is a revamp of a character I created for a children’s book about five years ago. TM & ©2009-2014, Ashley Rebekah.

In Russian folklore, every home is said to have a domovoi: a house spirit who protects the family and sometimes helps out with household chores. Most domovoi are good, but some will cause mischief if the home (and he) feels neglected.


This is a revamp of a character I created for a children’s book about five years ago. TM & ©2009-2014, Ashley Rebekah.

domovoi russian folkflore